Syphilis is returning

syphilis

Syphilis is returning

A serious health threat of widespread concern

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are amongst the most common infectious diseases globally. They represent a serious health threat given their potentially serious complications and the fact they increase susceptibility to other infections. Highly sexually active people with multiple sexual partners, those who do not use condoms, drug abusers and commercial sex workers are at high risk. Symptoms should be checked regularly as these infections can have severe long-term consequences for the individual’s and their partner’s health.

A major challenge is the new rise of syphilis. Left untreated, syphilis causes significant complications, although it can be successfully treated with antibiotics. However, in many countries, traditionally in the developing and emerging regions, a failure to diagnose and treat lowers the chance of containment.

Infection rates in Russia and China have increased dramatically since the late 1990s, and in the United States the syphilis prevalence rate has crept upward since 2000, increasing by 11 per cent between 2011 and 2012.1 Significant increases have also been noted in certain European countries, including in the Czech Republic, Denmark, Ireland, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, with several countries reporting more than 30 per cent increases between 2009 and 2010.2

SyphilisInfographic

Syphilis: The comeback of a historic disease Download PDF

The comeback of a historic disease

The new rise of syphilis is frequently associated with high-risk sexual practices among men who have sex with men (MSM). This group accounts for 75 per cent of all primary and secondary syphilis cases in the United States and prevalence is increasing.3 In other countries, syphilis prevalence among MSM is more than 15 per cent, including in Afghanistan, Argentina, Fiji, Guatemala, Jamaica, Morocco, Nicaragua and Paraguay.4

This group accounts for 75 per cent of all primary and secondary syphilis cases in the United States and prevalence is increasing.3 In other countries, syphilis prevalence among MSM is more than 15 per cent, including in Afghanistan, Argentina, Fiji, Guatemala, Jamaica, Morocco, Nicaragua and Paraguay.4

In the United States, heterosexually transmitted syphilis and congenital syphilis may also be emerging issues.5 Among men who have sex with women only, syphilis cases increased 4 per cent between 2011 and 2012.6 Young people, who acquire nearly half of all new STDs in the United States, and are at a higher risk of acquiring STDs than other age groups for a combination of behavioural, biological and cultural factors, also exhibit a worrying trend. Youth aged 20 to 24 are contracting syphilis at the highest rate, with rates among men aged 20-24 increasing each consecutive year since 2002.7 In several European countries, the diagnosis of syphilis is increasingly common among teenagers 16-19 years old.8

Approximately 1.5 million pregnancies are affected by syphilis every year and congenital syphilis, which occurs when the infection is passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus, is a leading cause of stillbirth and perinatal mortality in many developing countries.9 Since congenital syphilis can be prevented, pregnant women should be tested for syphilis regularly and receive immediate treatment if necessary.

Roche in infectious disease

For more than 30 years Roche is providing diagnostic solutions for infectious diseases, and the assays for blood screening use technologies specifically developed for the company’s serology and nucleic acid testing platforms. Since their launch in 1996, more than a hundred high-quality Elecsys® assays for immune testing have been developed, not to mention a new generation of fully automated cobas® analyzers for improved medical decision making, scheduling and efficiency.

With the Elecsys® Syphilis immunoassay, Roche provides a new a diagnostic test to help detect patients infected with syphilis in routine clinical practice and to make sure donated blood is not contaminated. The test minimizes the likelihood of missing syphilis infections, enabling healthcare professionals in laboratories to efficiently run a single test within 18 minutes, ensuring the safe and timely supply of blood products. Moreover, its high specificity facilitates a clear and consistent interpretation of results at all disease stages with a minimal need for re-testing, providing maximum efficiency gains for the laboratory and patient safety.

References

1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). Sexually transmitted disease surveillance 2012 (Atlanta: CDC).

2) European Center for Prevention and Disease Control (2012). Sexually transmitted infections in Europe 1990-2010 (Stockholm: ECDC).

3) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). Reported STDs in the United States – 2012 national data for chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis.

4) UNAIDS (2011). Global HIV/AIDS response – epidemic update and health sector progress towards universal access – progress report 2011.

5) Stamm, Lola V. (2010). ‘Global challenge of antibiotic-resistant Treponema pallidum’, Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Feb 2010: 583-589.

6) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). Sexually transmitted disease surveillance 2012 (Atlanta: CDC).

7) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012). STD surveillance 2011. Atlanta.

8) Samkange-Zeeb, Florence N. et al (2011). ‘Awareness and knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among school-going adolescents in Europe: a systematic review of published literature’, BMC Public Health 11:727.

9) Stamm, Lola V. (2010). ‘Global challenge of antibiotic-resistant Treponema pallidum’, Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Feb 2010: 583-589.